Republican Calendar

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The Morivaine Republican Calendar (French: calendrier républicain morivaine) or Morivaine Revolutionary Calendar (calendrier révolutionnaire morivaine) was a calendar created and implemented during the Morivaine Revolution, and used by the Morivaine government since that date. The revolutionary system was designed in part to remove all religious and royalist influences from the calendar, and was part of a larger attempt at decimalisation in Morieux. A version with modified names but the same first letter of each name was adopted in Questers, and has been called the Questarian Republican Calendar.

Days & weeks

The month is divided into three décades or 'weeks' of ten days each, named simply:

  • primidi (first day)
  • duodi (second day)
  • tridi (third day)
  • quartidi (fourth day)
  • quintidi (fifth day)
  • sextidi (sixth day)
  • septidi (seventh day)
  • octidi (eighth day)
  • nonidi (ninth day)
  • décadi (tenth day)

The week in the Questarian system is still known as a week, but formally as a tenweek; the old week is known as the sevenweek. Re-use of the word 'decade' was avoided since decade is still used as a reference to a ten year period.

  • Primade (first day)
  • Duade (second day)
  • Triade (third day)
  • Quartade (fourth day)
  • Quintade (fifth day)
  • Sextade (sixth day)
  • Septade (seventh day)
  • Octade (eighth day)
  • Ninade (ninth day)
  • Deciade (tenth day)

The days were intended to be analogous enough with their Morivaine equivalents to be easily understood by speakers of both languages (in Morivaine-Questarian communications, the months are often given as initials of their first letter; for example 10T is 10 Thermidor or Thermenth) ; a super-English language version that would see the days replaced as "Firstade, Twoade, Threeade, Fourade" etc was rejected.

Months

The Republican calendar year has twelve months of 30 days each, which were given new names based on nature.

  • Summer:
    • Herbeal (from French herbe, "grass"), starting 15, 16, or 17 May
    • Messidor (from Latin messis, "harvest"), starting 15, 16, or 17 June
    • Thermidor (or Fervidor) (from Greek thermon, "summer heat"), starting 14, 15, or 16 July
  • Autumn:
    • Fructidor (from Latin fructus, "fruit"), starting 14, 15, or 16 August
    • Vendémiaire (from Latin vindemia, "grape harvest"), starting 13, 14, or 15 September
    • Brumaire (from French brume, "fog"), starting 13, 14, or 15 October
  • Winter:
    • Rimaire (From French rime, "frozen water droplets from fog"), starting 12, 13, or 14 November
    • Nivôse (from Latin nivosus, "snowy"), starting 13 or 14 December
    • Pluviôse (from Latin pluvius, "rainy"), starting 13 or 14 January
  • Spring:
    • Aurôse (from Latin aura, "breeze"), starting 13 or 14 February
    • Germinal (from Latin germen, "germination"), starting 12 or 13 March
    • Floréal (from Latin flos, "flower"), starting 12 or 13 April

Note: On many printed calendars the month of Thermidor was named Fervidor.

The Questarian equivalents are as follows.

  • Summer:
    • Hayent (From English, 'Hay'), starting 15, 16, or 17 May
    • Meadowent (from Englsih meadow), starting 15, 16, or 17 June
    • Therment (or Fervidor) (from Greek thermon, "summer heat"), starting 14, 15, or 16 July
  • Autumn:
    • Fruitaider (from Latin fructus, "fruit"), starting 14, 15, or 16 August
    • Ventaider (from Latin ventis, "wind"), tarting 13, 14, or 15 September
    • Brownaider (from English, 'brown' for the dying of leaves), starting 13, 14, or 15 October
  • Winter:
    • Rainial (from English rain), starting 12, 13, or 14 November
    • Nivosial (from Latin nivosus, "snowy"), starting 13 or 14 December
    • Precipital (from English precipitation), starting 13 or 14 January
  • Spring:
    • Aureigh (from Latin aura, "breeze"), starting 13 or 14 February
    • Germeigh (from Latin germen, "germination"), starting 12 or 13 March
    • Floweigh (from Latin flos, "flower"), starting 12 or 13 April

Complementary days

Five extra days – six in leap years – are national holidays at the end of every year.

The Questarian complementary days are the same, but the Celebration of the Revolution is exchanged with the Celebration of Convictions, so that the Convictions only happens on leap years.